Biden faces pressure to delay withdrawal of remaining troops from Afghanistan

Nation/world
U.S. soldiers on patrol in Afghanistan’s Wardak province in 2013.(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

U.S. soldiers on patrol in Afghanistan’s Wardak province in 2013.(Carolyn Cole / Los Angeles Times)

President Biden is under pressure to delay the withdrawal of the remaining U.S. troops in Afghanistan, a decision that has forced a vexing early debate within his national security team about whether ending America’s longest war will plunge the violence-plagued country deeper into chaos.

It’s a decision that Biden inherited from former President Trump, who negotiated a withdrawal timetable with the Taliban but left the final and most difficult step of actually ending the war to his successor.

Though Biden has long favored shrinking the U.S. military presence in Afghanistan, current and former national security officials warn the president that even after nearly two decades in Afghanistan, the departure of U.S. forces there could lead to a resurgence of Al Qaeda, the militant group behind the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks.

Biden’s national security team is looking for ways to pressure the Taliban to reduce attacks, break with Al Qaeda and return to peace talks before the final 2,500 troops are scheduled to depart in four months, according to officials familiar with the deliberations.

Read the full story on LATimes.com.

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