Endangered trout species thrives in remote Nevada lake with help from Native American tribe

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James Simmons, a doctoral student with the Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology program of University of Nevada, Reno, studies a Lahontan cutthroat trout at Summit Lake in this image released by the school in July 2020.

James Simmons, a doctoral student with the Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology program of University of Nevada, Reno, studies a Lahontan cutthroat trout at Summit Lake in this image released by the school in July 2020.

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A half-century after being added to the endangered species list, Lahontan cutthroat trout are thriving with help from a Native American tribe at a remote lake in northern Nevada.

Summit Lake Paiute Tribe members and scientists from the University of Nevada, Reno say the recovery of the Summit Lake population of the fish could provide a model for recovery efforts in other lakes such as Walker and Tahoe.

The Lahontan cutthroat is Nevada’s state fish and North America’s largest freshwater native trout species.

The fish has crimson red-orange slash marks on the throat under the jaw and black spots over steel gray to olive green scales.

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