Some Wealthy Parents Cut Plea Deals in College Admissions Scam While Others Fight on

Nation/world
Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin appear at the John Joseph Moakley Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. (Credit: Paul Marotta/JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)

Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin appear at the John Joseph Moakley Courthouse in Boston on April 3, 2019. (Credit: Paul Marotta/JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP/Getty Images)

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In a busy week in the college admissions scandal, some accused parents have decided to cooperate with prosecutors.

One couple that balked, however, has been indicted with an added charge of money laundering, indicating the government is ready to wield more charges as leverage.

The question is how many will continue to fight — and whether those who cooperate are providing information that authorities could use to build more cases.

Some legal experts have said it makes sense to cut deals, giving the evidence prosecutors have amassed. They have laid out hundreds of pages of wiretapped phone conversations, emails, and bank and tax records in depicting a scheme that rigged college entrance exams and corrupted the athletic recruiting processes of at least eight universities.

Read the full story at LATimes.com.

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