State Dept. to Stop Sending Military Dogs on Overseas Assignments After Series of Canine Deaths

Nation/World
U.S. military K-9 Conan, the dog that assisted Special Forces soldiers in the raid that killed ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, poses for photographs with President Donald Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and first lady Melania Trump on the Rose Garden colonnade at the White House Nov. 25, 2019. (Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

U.S. military K-9 Conan, the dog that assisted Special Forces soldiers in the raid that killed ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, poses for photographs with President Donald Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and first lady Melania Trump on the Rose Garden colonnade at the White House Nov. 25, 2019. (Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Military dogs like Conan, who took part in a recent U.S. special operations raid that led to the death of Islamic State founder Abu Bakr Baghdadi in Syria, get headlines and a White House visit.

But other U.S. working dogs are deployed overseas as well to sniff for drugs, ferret out explosives, guard civilians and do other important tasks. Many are under the control of local handlers.

A new report by the State Department’s inspector general says some of those dogs are dying from neglect, heat stroke, poisoning and disease. The report did not say how many dogs had died, but it appeared to be about a dozen.

State Department officials, who oversee the dog program through the Diplomatic Security and Counterterrorism bureaus, said Monday they were alarmed by the report and were taking measures to ensure better conditions and the safety of the animals.

Read the full story on LATimes.com

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