1,000-Year Storm, Flash Flooding in Death Valley Prompt Closure of Scotty’s Castle

El Niño
This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.

Scotty’s Castle, one of the most popular landmarks in Death Valley National Park, will be closed for at least a year because of an Oct. 18 flash flood that sent a raging river of water and mud through the park.

Hardest hit was Grapevine Canyon, the home of Scotty’s Castle at the northern end of the 5,270-square-mile park, which is only slightly smaller than the state of Connecticut.

The Oct. 18 storm dumped 2.7 inches of rain, more than the region typically gets in a year.

Scotty’s Castle, an ornate mansion built as a vacation getaway in the 1930s, suffered serious damage. So did the two-lane, paved highway leading to the attraction. Ten miles of roadway was destroyed.

Click here to read the full story on LATimes.com.

A park ranger stands on a road damaged in an Oct. 18, 2015, storm in Death Valley. (Credit: Death Valley National Park)
A park ranger stands on a road damaged in an Oct. 18, 2015, storm in Death Valley. (Credit: Death Valley National Park)

Most Popular

Latest News

More News

KTLA on Instagram

Instagram

KTLA on Facebook

KTLA on Twitter