Is El Niño Wimping Out in Southern California? Not Quite

Weather

These satellite image of Pacific sea surface heights from Jason-2 (left) differs slightly from one 18 years ago from Topex/Poseidon (right). In 1997, sea surface height was more intense and peaked in November. In 2015, the area of high sea levels is less intense but considerably broader. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This is an archived article and the information in the article may be outdated. Please look at the time stamp on the story to see when it was last updated.
Data pix.

Los Angeles is facing sunshine and warmth this week even as El Niño remains strong 1,000 to 2,000 miles south of California. It’s the third week without big storms this month. But El Niño is not wimping out.

Put simply, it’s too early for El Niño-influenced rains to arrive in Southern California.

During the last two strong El Niños on record, the heaviest rains came during February 1998 and March 1983, said Bill Patzert, climatologist for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge.

Click here to read the full story at LATimes.com.

Maps, Radar and Other Data

Surf Report (Stats by Solspot)

Surf Report (Stats by Solspot)

Surf Report (Stats by Solspot)

Los Angeles Virtual Doppler

Los Angeles Virtual Doppler

Southwest Doppler Radar

Southwest Doppler Radar

California Satellite Radar

California Satellite Radar

Los Angeles Basin Radar

Los Angeles Basin Radar

Orange County Radar

Orange County Radar

Inland Empire Radar

Inland Empire Radar

Most Popular

Latest News

More News